ghost-buddha:

"Racism will go away if we stop talking about it" alright I’m going to prescribe you a nap, because you are suffering from a baby’s psychology called lack of object permanence, where you genuinely believe shit doesn’t exist when you aren’t acknowledging it

inmyufo:

still haven’t received a response 😔

andthebluestblue:

stop saying “his or her”

use “their”

piss off prescriptivists
acknowledge nonbinary identities
make your sentences less clunky
advocate for common usage which is what leads to grammatical acceptance 

A message from Anonymous
you just want to derail what feminists are doing to stop gamergate
A reply from shitrichcollegekidssay

Y’all do realize you’re getting upset over people who are disabled and mentally ill telling y’all not to use certain language/phrasing/words because it adversely affects them in their day-to-day lives, and then going on to explain how it does so… … again you’re … upset over being told you shouldn’t do something … because it actively harms people … and these people… actively harmed by what you’re doing are telling you … they’re being harmed… and that you shouldn’t do it. just in case that wasn’t clear.

but ahhh yes… pointing out ableism on my blog in my own post that I made is the same as being against feminism and for gamergate and pulling apart entire arguments made against male privilege/entitlement. ok.

because apparently you can only be a feminist activist if you ignore all other forms of oppression in favor of putting white neurotypical upper-class cishet women without disabilities as first priority always. what kind of second wave 60s bullshit are we on about now. jfc.

marissavoir:

I had the tremendous pleasure of going to the Northwest Teaching for Social Justice Conference, where at the start of a very full day I was able to see Enid Lee deliver the keynote in all of her joyous, ebullient, razor sharp glory. Here she is maybe inviting people up to help move the couch, a high school theatre prop, to offer an extemporaneous metaphor for Eurocentric curriculum. She said, “I don’t like to get too fancy. Let’s think of racial hierarchies as a ladder. With every single thing we do, we must ask: are we redesigning the ladder? Are we dismantling it to make a circle? Or are we maintaining it?” Flipping the rungs so someone different is at the bottom is not what equity is about. Every single time we step into a classroom. With every single intimate conversation we have with our family or friends. Are we reimagining and dismantling the ladder? Or are we upholding it?

ON THAT NOTE. I took extensive notes and came away with a lot of resources. Lately I’ve been feeling the weight of being one of the only POC staff in schools where I see real damage being done to my precious students by clumsy, privileged, oblivious hands. I’ve been employing what strategies I can with vague anxieties about the ways I am still unable to help bridge seemingly insurmountable chasms between my students, other staff, and the curriculum itself. I came away from this conference feeling a bit more in touch with resources, particularly with designing effective, interactive, critical thinking units on social justice issues, having real discussions with student in early education to help them in their process of developing a race consciousness, and finding ways around high stakes standardized testing.
I am eager as fuck to share with any of you. I know that these resources and conversations barely exist and I want to make the arsenal I’ve assembled as accessible as possible. Please feel free to reach out. Keep doing good work out there, whether you’re a formal educator or do your instruction on micro levels on the fly, as so many of us do. xxxxx

I had the tremendous pleasure of going to the Northwest Teaching for Social Justice Conference, where at the start of a very full day I was able to see Enid Lee deliver the keynote in all of her joyous, ebullient, razor sharp glory. Here she is maybe inviting people up to help move the couch, a high school theatre prop, to offer an extemporaneous metaphor for Eurocentric curriculum. She said, “I don’t like to get too fancy. Let’s think of racial hierarchies as a ladder. With every single thing we do, we must ask: are we redesigning the ladder? Are we dismantling it to make a circle? Or are we maintaining it?” Flipping the rungs so someone different is at the bottom is not what equity is about. Every single time we step into a classroom. With every single intimate conversation we have with our family or friends. Are we reimagining and dismantling the ladder? Or are we upholding it?

parrnasse:

trends guys hate:

  1. crop tops and high waisted shorts
  2. red lipstick

trends girls hate:

  1. being murdered
  2. being murdered for wearing crop tops and high waisted shorts